Make Each Mile Worth the Ride

1,200 miles in three days is what I gave myself to ride from Motorcycle Week in Laconia, N.H., to our Open House Rally Event in Monticello, Iowa.

Quaint New England town

Now, 400 miles a day seems quite easy, but it was raining when I departed Laconia and it looked like I was going to stay in it for quite a while. What I thought was going to be an uneventful ride started to improve about an hour east after the rain ceased and the twisty two lane roads increased.

Free food at the Bikers Stop for anyone that pulled in

FREE FOOD BIKERS WELCOME signs started popping up along the road and peaked my interest. I wasn’t hungry but stopping to see what was going on seemed mandatory.

An interesting stop on a rural New Hampshire two lane

Apparently a group of bikers have been giving out free food for many years here during the Laconia Rally.

It's always a good day to ride

It was there that I ran into my friend Shadow (eastern editor of Thunder Press) and decided to ride with her until our paths would split in different directions.

Soaked to the wallet and two boots full

After we removed our rain gear due to the 90 degree heat, we got soaked to the wallet.

As all bikers do at some point we stopped under an overpass to access matters. We met these riders without windshields

She was heading home to New Jersey about 300 more miles and invited me to crash there for the night.

While on my way through New Hampshire I stopped for a visit with Rob at Retrocycle

The next morning I decided to backtrack a little and visit Rob Nussbaum the owner of Retrocycle who does antique motorcycle restoration. I’ve worked in bike shops most of my life and even owned my own so visiting other shops has always been a treat for me.

Aged to Perfection

Aged to perfection.

Just a few of the bikes at Retrocycle

Just a few of the bikes at Retrocycle.

Hit some storms and road construction but as with everything it shall pass

The next day I had to make up for lost time but it didn’t quite happen. A 10 mile traffic jam set me back several hours and more rain wasn’t helping. I hit some storms and road construction but, as with everything, it shall pass.

Then I spotted him, a lone biker on the side of the road that had ran out of gas. I refuse to leave anyone stranded so I asked if he didn’t mind squeezing on my already overpacked bike.

I refuse to leave a lone motorcyclist stranded on the road. I gave him a ride quite a few miles to and from the gas station and was laughing all the way because I had to sit all the way up on

Of course he jumped on and we rode to the next exit with me sitting all the way up on my tank with my knees jammed into the fairing. I’ve got to say that I was laughing all the way to the station and all the way back to his bike. It reminded me of my trip to Vietnam a couple winters ago where it was common to see a family of five on a 100cc street bike.

And the journey to Iowa continued.

Built without mortar this type of bridge construction was used primarily in the Contoocook River Vally during the first half of the Nineteenth Century

Built without mortar, this type of bridge construction was used primarily in the Contoocook River Vally during the first half of the Nineteenth Century.

Gliding along like an eagle in flight

Gliding along like an eagle in flight.

Like two ships passing in the night

Like two ships passing in the night.

The Wave

The wave.

Iowa welcomes you

Iowa welcomes you.

Last gas stop before I make it to Anamosa. Note that there isn't room for two on this bike

Last gas stop before I make it to Anamosa. Note that there isn’t room for two on this bike.

The next day I rolled into J&P Cycles at Anamosa, Iowa, and was quite happy with the ride that I thought would be uneventful.

If you enjoyed this blog, be sure to follow along with all of Joe Sparrow’s adventures on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter at #WanderingSparrow and right here on the blog.

By |2015-07-09T09:29:23+00:00July 9th, 2015|Categories: Editorial/Commentary Articles, News/Events Articles|Comments Off on Make Each Mile Worth the Ride

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