If It’s Not Broke, Don’t Fix It. Right? Wrong.

JP responsiveAs with anything, there’s always room for improvement. You may never see them, but behind the scenes at J&P Cycles, we have a collaborative team of product merchants, web developers, photographers, writers and designers, to name a few, who are constantly working to improve our website to make your life easier.

If you’ve been paying attention over the last year, or even the last six months, you may have noticed some subtle differences to our website, especially if you shop on a phone or tablet. Several years in the making, J&P Cycles finally launched its first responsive pages on the website this past March.

What is responsive? What does that mean to you? Responsive website design, according to Wikipedia (because responsive web design didn’t exist in Webster’s days), “adapts the website layout to the viewing environment by using fluid, proportion-based grids, flexible images and CSS3 media queries.” Huh? In short, responsive web pages automatically adjust the website you’re viewing to the screen size of whatever electronic device you are using, such as tablets, mobile phones and desktop computers.

When you’re shopping on your mobile phone or tablet, you might not even be aware of whether the site you’re looking at is responsive or not. Or you might notice, and you might get tired of constantly zooming in and moving around on the page to find what you’re looking for.

That’s where responsive steps in. In March, we started our new web design rollout with our product pages, knowing that’s probably where you spend a lot of your time, whether you’re shopping around for the best price online or you’re trying to read the product reviews or description.

We then gradually moved more and more sections of our site to responsive until July 30, when we launched the entire site change. While there are a few lingering, individual pages that don’t adjust to smart phones and tablets, we’re happy to say that the majority of them do.

But still, why should you care? Because, without responsive design, you’d either be spending most of your time zooming in and out to find what you need, or you’d give up and shop somewhere else. But we didn’t want that, and we don’t want to lose our most valuable customers.

Throughout the year, while we were transitioning to our responsive site, there were other, more subtle changes happening. Because J&P Cycles has more than 100,000 motorcycle parts and accessories online, we know that it can get pretty hard to sift through all of that to find what you really need.

The next project on our list was recategorization — tediously reviewing each and every category and product on our website to find the best way to organize and rename them in a way that would make your shopping experience better. After nearly a year, we’re about ready to wrap up that project and tie it with a bow, just in time for Christmas.

Falling in line with web design changes, we also had some fun with our home page. You may have noticed the top of the home page looking cleaner, sleeker and a little less cluttered. Our designers have been designing and testing and designing and testing to put what you’re looking for exactly where you can find it. And they’re not done yet.

Last but not least, you may have noticed a little button that says “Live Help.” If you’re on a tablet or mobile device, you can’t miss it. If you’re on your desktop or laptop, look to the bottom, right-hand corner. When you click on that little guy you’ll have the option to email J&P Cycles, chat live with a technician or customer service representative, call us directly, browse our FAQs, how-to videos, buying guides and more, or connect with us on social. If you haven’t seen it, check it out!

Even though we have accomplished several large goals over the last year, we’re not done yet. With our innovative team members and your feedback, we are constantly at work to make your website experience even better.

By | 2015-04-15T13:21:05+00:00 November 19th, 2014|Categories: Editorial/Commentary Articles|Comments Off on If It’s Not Broke, Don’t Fix It. Right? Wrong.

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