How-To Articles

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Top 10 Tips Before You Get Out and Ride

Are you ready to ride? Patrick from J&P Cycles walks you through the top ten things to check out before you get on your bike this spring.

  1. Check your fluids: oil, tranny and primary fluid—make sure you check them all. If you didn’t change them going into winter, now’s the perfect time. If you need help with that, we have videos to help you out.
    1. How to Change Transmission Fluid
    2. How to Change Motorcycle Primary Oil
    3. How to Change Motorcycle Oil
  2. Check your fuel. If you didn’t stabilize your fuel going into winter, something like Star Tron will rejuvenate that fuel, so when you go out and ride, you won’t
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By |2015-04-14T14:49:14+00:00February 25th, 2015|Categories: How-To Articles|1 Comment

Kuryakyn Lower Fork Cover Install

Towards the end of last year we added a Victory to the current stable of J&P motorcycles, a Cross Country to be exact. We immediately started modifying it starting with some Vance and Hines mufflers and then during Biketoberfest we did a series of Ness upgrades smack dab in the middle of the rally. The Ness installs were rather extensive, including a raked set of triple trees to accommodate our 23” wheel along with Ness modular handlebars, foot and hand controls and a whole slew of billet accessories. But we’re not done yet, while we sit snowbound here in Iowa we are going to continue with our modification.

PG blog pic 1

Since … Continue Reading

By |2015-04-14T13:29:09+00:00January 8th, 2015|Categories: How-To Articles|Comments Off on Kuryakyn Lower Fork Cover Install

Do It Yourself! See How to Change Oil, Other Fluids

It’s an old adage, but it’s true – a few quarts of oil is cheaper than a new motor, transmission, etc. More often than not it’s not about the money. It’s about not having the time to do it, or maybe not having the knowledge, which leads to doubting yourself and worrying that you will possibly tear your beloved motorcycle up.

Have no fear, J&P Cycles is here to help. There is nothing we like more than our customers spinning wrenches and working on their own machines. We took a little time to walk you through the typical fluid changes on a late-model Harley bagger. For “most” Harleys this will … Continue Reading

By |2015-04-14T14:54:46+00:00December 29th, 2014|Categories: How-To Articles|22 Comments

Whaddya Mean It’s Too Cold to Ride?

125-997_AWinter can be a hard mistress for riders, and a down right bitch to your bike, especially if you’re the kind of rider that like’s to keep going no matter how crappy the weather. Short trips, low temperatures and roads covered in a toxic mix of salt, sand and snow can really tear up your bike if you’re not careful. But with a little extra care and a good preventive maintenance program, you can thumb your nose at old man winter, and keep riding when lesser men have tucked their bikes away until spring. Here are a few simple tips for making the season as painless as possible.

126-066_AWinter is … Continue Reading

By |2015-04-14T15:04:23+00:00October 15th, 2014|Categories: Editorial/Commentary Articles, How-To Articles|2 Comments

How to Test Your Motorcycle Charging System

911-011_ARequired Tools: DC voltmeter or battery tester

As a general rule, modern charging systems are efficient, reliable and maintenance free; however, there are exceptions to every rule and few problems will leave you stranded as quickly as charging system that’s gone kaput. Fortunately keeping tabs on the system is relatively easy; all it takes is a simple DC voltmeter or battery tester.

To start, let’s clear up a fundamental misunderstanding about batteries. Batteries do not create electricity. At least no more than a refrigerator creates food. In both instances the devices are merely storage containers. Both accumulate and return what you put into them. If you use up … Continue Reading

By |2018-04-06T11:23:09+00:00July 10th, 2014|Categories: How-To Articles|17 Comments

How to Read a Motorcycle Tire

IMG_1539Describing a motorcycle tire as a round, black piece of rubber that’s about a two-foot diameter circle won’t give you the information you need to make a smart buying decision, will it? When it comes to tires, particularly the ones you plan to use on your motorcycle, information is a very handy thing to have. This is especially true if you’re interested in replacing those tires and even more so if you plan to replace them with something other than the OEM tires.

To make it a little easier, the tire manufacturers have come up with nomenclature that describes everything you need to know about your tire and printed it … Continue Reading

By |2015-04-14T15:03:34+00:00June 20th, 2014|Categories: How-To Articles|8 Comments

Tubeless Motorcycle Tire Repair

Tubeless Tire Repair KitIf there’s anything that is worse than being stranded with a flat tire, it’s being stranded with no way to repair it. Picture it: you’re out on a beautiful Sunday morning, the bikes purring like Tony Bennett crooning I left my heart, and all of sudden the tire loses pressure. What moments ago was a pristine example of motorcycle design in motion is now about as awesome as a hobo pushing a shopping cart. Worse yet, there’s no help in sight. This pretty much defines a “this friggin’ sucks moment,” doesn’t it?

Unfortunately motorcycle tires rarely go flat at convenient times and even fewer bikes pack a spare, which … Continue Reading

By |2015-04-15T14:48:00+00:00May 2nd, 2014|Categories: How-To Articles|Comments Off on Tubeless Motorcycle Tire Repair

How to Install a Motorcycle Exhaust System

ExhaustStock pipes are fine, but don’t always provide the look, sound or performance you want. Fortunately swapping them out for something that does suit your needs is an easy and inexpensive way to upgrade your ride, and it shouldn’t take more than a few hours at most, even if you’ve never done it before.

First up, here is a list of exactly what you’ll need:

  • 3/8ths drive socket set (Fractional for HD’s, metric for everything else).
  • Combination wrenches in the appropriate sizes.
  • Any sockets or wrenches peculiar to your bike i.e. Torx or Allen wrenches.
  • 3/8 drive torque wrench
  • Aerosol lubricant (WD-40, CRC 556 etc.)
  • Anti-seize
  • Shop manual: Aftermarket is
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By |2015-04-14T13:29:47+00:00April 16th, 2014|Categories: How-To Articles|6 Comments