The Evolution of My Evolution

8

January 14, 2013 | By: Rick Jessen

015Editor’s Note: Rick Jessen joined the Daytona J&P Cycles staff in May of 2005 as a phone technician (prior to the opening of the Destination Daytona SuperStore). In mid-2008, he transferred to the then-new Destination Daytona SuperStore showroom to hold a showroom sales/tech position. A below the knee amputee, Rick loves giving back and does so by assisting the disabled with their disability applications. When not working or helping others, Rick and his wife, love riding their Shovelhead.

This first blog in a series from Rick is to show you what can be done to personalize your motorcycle with a little imagination and a J&P Cycles catalog. A plus, one doesn’t need to spend a fortune on custom, fabricated one-of-a-kind parts.

I guess the easiest way to start this is with a little background. I am a rider. I have been riding since about 1967 and my motorcycle is built to ride. I like to mess with people who talk about a bike not being pretty. The only part of my Shovelhead that is pretty is the taillight because that’s all others will see. I built my motor to do one thing – go when I twist the throttle – so that’s why the rear of the bike is about all anyone sees.  The motor is a 86” stroker and it is still a day-in day-out ride.

Anyway, on with my main story, back in September I received a call from my sister about some money we were about to receive after the closing of our late father’s estate. When I finished the call I turned to my wife and half way through the sentence she finished it with “buy a new motorcycle.”  Now we both have been riding for over 40 years and she loves the shovel too, but understands that if I get a “new” bike it would be a FXR.  Needless to say one fell in my lap while talking to a friend I knew. Rick JessenHe made me a deal on a 1992 FXR and 1986 FLHTU that I couldn’t pass up. I bought both and owned the dresser for all of 15 minutes then sold it. The reasoning behind the FXR is that it happens to have probably the best horsepower to weight ratio that H-D made.  Even by today’s standards they don’t make a bike as light weight or with the kind of horsepower that the FXR has.  It handles like a dream – rolls in and out of corners with ease and has quick response when you grab a handful of throttle. This one was actually an FXRS-CON, but the leather bags have long been taken off and lost or sold, and the air system on the front tubes removed and now has a dual disc front. The bike has been customized some with a chrome dual tube style for the rear swingarm, the stock oil bag has been replaced with a chrome one, the CV carb was replaced with a S&S E with a hypercharger. The handlebars were replaced with 6” T bars, chrome controls and the rear fender was changed to a bobbed style. As you will see the bike will be transformed over the next couple of blogs and I will include pictures along with an explanation as to why I chose the parts I used along with part numbers.

Comments (8)

Rick I can’t wait to see where it ends. I have a 89FXRP that I’m customizing also, so I’m looking forward to some tips. Like you I went to a Bobbed rear, didn’t care for the stock one and I went with a wide glide conversion front end. The engine is stock (I think).
I’m starting to plan for some engine up grades to get some more power. I don’t drag race or like to run 100mph. What I’m looking for is passing power. Here in the hills passing lanes are short so I want to get around the vehicle fast. What would you recommend doing first short of a major overhaul?

Thanks Mitch

Mitch,
If your looking to bump up the engine a bit to get around those hay wagons and such I would suggest an Andrews EV-27 CAM. this is a bolt in cam calling for no head work. It pulls from 2000rpm to 6000+. At instalation time I would suggest putting in adjustable pushrods as that would eliminate having to take the rocker boxes apart and easier maintenance on the valve train.

I too have a 93 FXR and I have pretty much customized the heck out of it, using parts exclusively from J&P, (definitly keep the rear fender) the origanal looks like a scared dog with its tail tucked. I’m always curious to see what other people do with them.

My wifes 90FXR- she’s had it 18 years, got 180K plus miles on it. I do all the wrenching. Some notes: SE251 cam wakes it up without straining anything. I binned that front brake calliper- it was like squeezing a 2×4- & fir a PM model. Way more better. Progrewssive suspension springs rounded out the front end. It came w/ Thunderheaders, they are still on there all these years. i breathed on the carb some- opened the vac port a slosh, did a few other simple cv carb tricks. put in a Dyna S ignition. I drilled the backing plate so I could put oil on the advancer pivots now & then, they last a long time. She rides the snot out of it. She’d have more miles on it but for the 06 RK she bought herself new, for the longer hauls…..

Lose that rear fender, bro ;-)

HEY RJ, KEEP THE REAR FENDER, LOOKING GOOD. YOU KNOW, I LOVE EVOS ! I DO DOZ OF SHOWS & AUCTIONS, ALL YEAR LONG. I SEE DOZ OF FXR, & I’M ALWAYS TEMPTED TO BUY. WHAT YRS WERE THEY BUILT, IS ONE YR BETTER, OR MORE VALUABLE THAN ANOTHER YR, SAY LIKE 56 STRAIGHT LEG PAN, 65 PAN, 66 SHOVEL, ETC. OR, LIKE SERIOUS VETT LOVERS, THE 67 IS BETTER & MORE VALUABLE THAN A 63. I SEE PRICES ALL OVER THE PLACE, $ 2,000.-/ $ 12,000.- & THE $ 2,000.- FXR LOOKING NICER THAN THE $ 12,000.- FXR ? WHAT SHOULD I BE LOOKING FOR, OR STAYING AWAY FROM ? TILL LATER, ENJOY THE FXR, BOSTON JIM

FXR’s were produced from 1982-1994, then again 1999-2000. They were the first rubber mounted 5-speed tranny bikes. And one of their best sellers.

Looking good in the neighborhood. Keep us posted and ride it up here when your done.

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