Rolling on Through the Wintertime Blues

1

December 21, 2010 | By: Patrick Garvin

So there I sat, staring at my bike in the garage and allowing myself to slip into a bit of wintertime depression. The fact that the outside temps were in the single digits and there were five inches of snow on the ground didn’t help a bit. Add to that the fact that I haven’t taken my bike out for a spin in weeks, and what you have is a major pity party.

Adding to my misery is the fact that winter hasn’t even officially begun yet and Daytona Bike Week is still two and a half months away! Just before I started banging my head on my gas tank, I looked down and noticed that I need new tires. My next thought was, “Who cares? I’m not going anywhere anyway.”

Which brings me to my point. I snapped out of my winter time stupor and realized the following : Right now is the perfect time to change my tires! Why wait until the last minute before Bike Week. Or worse yet, forego a day of sunshine when riding season rolls around in order to swap skins on Ol’ Faithful? That doesn’t make a bit of sense. Buying new tires when you’ve got absolutely nothing better to do in the winter months is called perfect timing.

And when it comes to tires, J&P Cycles has you covered, from Dunlop to Metzeler or Avon to Michelin, Bridgestone, Shinko — the list goes on and on. High-mileage tires, sticky corner railing tires and everything in between. There’s no reason you can’t find the size or type of tire you’re looking for. And if you’re having trouble locating the correct tire, there’s always our online tire finding tool. Just plug in the brand, bike type or tire specs you’re looking for and Presto! We’ll take it from there and narrow your search to your exact specification.

So there you have it; wipe those wintertime tears from your eyes and get to work because there’s a warm front on the way and riding season will be here before you know it.

Comments: 1 Comment | Categorized Under: Tech Tips

Comments (1)

Here’s a suggestion for winter-time tire changing:

Take that new tire into the house and leave it for at least 24 hrs. A warm tire is MUCH easier to manipulate than one that’s been in a cold garage!!

Leave a comment