Keep Your Motorcycle Clean with the Air Force Blaster

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November 23, 2010 | By: Patrick Garvin

As the cold grasp of Old Man Winter gets tighter, those of us of the biker persuasion find ourselves either staring at our faithful steed sitting alone in the garage or using the down time to do something productive.

If you’ve finished up with the winterizing routine on your bike (see Preparing Your Motorcycle for Winter Hibernation), you might as well get off your duff and take the time to knock some of this summer’s leftover road grime off of the shiny parts. I know it’s hard to get started, because you’re already resigned to the fact that no matter how hard you scrub, unless you get all those little water droplets wiped off before they dry, you’re still going to be left with a dingy looking machine. So what’s the point?

The point is this: The Air Force Blaster machine can save you the painstaking labor of wiping down every centimeter of chrome and paint on your bike. These machines make drying your bike a breeze — and we mean that quite literally. To be more precise, it’s an extremely powerful breeze that is available in 8hp, 4hp, 1.17hp and the 1.3hp sidekick.

Not only will this machine cut the dry time of your bike by 75 percent, but it gets rid of the nasty water spots and streaks that would otherwise be left for you to rub down by hand. Kits are available with a variety of attachments to deliver warm air to the surface of your machine. So take some time to clean your two-wheeler this winter.

After all, the bike treated you well during riding season. Giving it a proper cleaning is the very least you can do.

Comments: 3 Comments | Categorized Under: Product Information

Comments (3)

Chamois

Harleys are chick magnets and who cares if Harley’s short suit is the electrics the rest is 1st rate and there are now cell phones and road service so ride what you like I will ride a Harley till I die.

I’ve known many to use compressed air from a compressor or leaf blower to dry their bikes. I’m always worried that I’ll force water into something where water’s not supposed to go.

What’s the air pressure from this thing? How safe is it to prevent any damage?

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